Wildlife

This forum is for serious discussions of any kind.

Moderator: Hall of Speakers Moderators

Re: Wildlife

Postby Batty » May 10th, 2011, 9:58:25 am

Snake warning! I hope none of you a phobic.

Some photos of snakes a fellow rescuer had in care. All these snake have been released into the wild since I took these photos.

Yellow faced whip-tailed snake.
Image
Yellow Faced Whip Snake by battyden, on Flickr
This fellow is fully grown, about 16 inches long and a danger if you are a baby gecko or skink. Venomous, but not to humans.

Australian coral snake
Image
Coral Snake by battyden, on Flickr
Venomous but not dangerous. Not to be confused with the North American coral snake which is highly dangerous. This little Aussie snake is quite quiet - you really have to work hard to make one grumpy enough to bite, and even if it does it'll be a "dry" warning bite. It takes a lot of energy to make venom so they don't waste it on non-foods.

Blue-bellied black snake
Image
Blue-bellied black snake by battyden, on Flickr
Not as common as the much larger red-bellied black snake. This fellow is quite venomous and will make you very ill if it bites. It is quite timid, though, and unlikely to attack. 99% of the people bitten by this snake were trying to kill it at the time. The bit chunk you can see taken out of this snake's neck is courtesy of a hoe.

Western Brown snake
Image
Western Brown Snake by battyden, on Flickr
This cute little snake is a baby, only 18 inches long. See him curled up there? That's him about to strike at my camera. Brown snakes are dangerously aggressive and massively venomous. A bite from this little snake would put me in hospital ICU. A bite from an adult will put you in the morgue if you don't get the antivenin in time. I have never been so nervous about photographing an animal before - this bloke scared me. And that takes some doing.
User avatar
Batty
CreaturesTrade
 
Posts: 20
Joined: January 8th, 2011, 9:49:30 pm
Gender: Male

Re: Wildlife

Postby TNHawke » May 10th, 2011, 11:24:39 pm

I've got a few things to report from the last few days.

There are SO many marmots, it's insane. And the babies, who are already young adults are coming out. I'm not sure which are cuter, the smaller babies, or the big fat adults!
It's kind of sad, the way they run and poof up their tails remind me of my old pet ferrets. But I've never seen a marmot do a war dance.

I got to SEE mule deer in the Rocky Creek canyon the other day! I've seen tracks and poop before, but this time I actually got to see the actual deer. I could see three, and it looked like one may have been a buck with just little fuzzy bumps for antlers.

I had Sam, my pet raven, on the back of my bicycle the same day that I saw the deer. I was afraid the raven nest I came across a few weeks ago had been abandoned. But under that bridge, they were there! And they were confused about Sam's presence. They kept giving a 'greeting' call along with a 'mild warning' because I was human and the dog was with us and we were close to Sam. Sam, however, was afraid. He ended up sitting on my arm making nervous sounds until we left. He didn't like them at all. Of course... Sam's afraid of ducks and sparrows and robins, especially if they fly overhead. But he'll pounce on the downed dove! I don't understand him...

I thought I'd seen a few other more interesting birds, but none are coming to mind right now.
Oh! Brewers and red-winged blackbirds are all back in town.


edit: I remembered the other neat find!

I saw a grey and yellow Western Garter Snake on my bike ride on Friday. I was amazed that she was out, it was only like 40 degrees outside (maybe warmer, but the wind chill was insane). My dog almost stepped on her! At first, I was afraid she already had been stepped on, or worse, run over by a bicycle (including mine), but she was just really cold and probably the pavement of the bike path was warmer than the dirt and grass.
So, of course I HAD to pick her up. *snerk* And while she was musking (kuz I've yet to meet a garter that didn't when handled directly from the wild) she everted her cloaca, and that's how I figure it was a girl. I held her until she was a bit warmer- and she settled right into my hands once she realized I wasn't going to hurt her, and my hands were warm. She did some lazy tongue tasting of the air and my fingers. Finally, I put her down on the other side of the path under the cover of some bunch grass. I was amazed at her camouflage, visually, she disappeared right into it- if I hadn't known she was there, I never would have seen her.
ImageImageImage




Hiatus...ish
If you want to reach me, you can email me at tnhawke@gmail.com, or find me on http://www.felisfire.com #6101

Explodeygriff made by the amazing Ruinily!
User avatar
TNHawke
CreaturesTrade
MagiStream Donor
 
Posts: 9931
Joined: June 15th, 2009, 1:35:40 am
Location: A kaleidoscope colored reality of my own design
Gender: Female

Re: Wildlife

Postby CaniSBlacK » May 18th, 2011, 8:19:05 am

Mod edit: No eggspam!
Image
User avatar
CaniSBlacK
CreaturesTrade
 
Posts: 5
Joined: May 15th, 2011, 5:18:08 am

Re: Wildlife

Postby Khricket » June 13th, 2011, 2:37:40 pm

I'm sitting here watching a group of blackbirds searching the yard for bugs or whatever. Five or six of them are lined up across the yard and they're doing a search. Several others are following behind. When one finds something it flies away to the nest, I suppose, and one of the ones behind moves up to take its place in the line. This isn't something I've ever seen before.
Image Image
User avatar
Khricket
CreaturesTrade
MagiStream Donor
 
Posts: 328
Joined: November 15th, 2009, 9:32:28 pm
Gender: Female

Re: Wildlife

Postby TxCat » June 13th, 2011, 6:58:57 pm

Yay (maybe) for intrusive wildlife!

When we took a hike through a sinkhole Saturday, I noticed what looked like a horned lizard on one of the logs. It wasn't one of our anoles as it was considerably bigger than they usually get. Problem is, horned lizards are desert dwellers and therefore not generally found in the rich tropical and semi-tropical environment of the sink hole.

As it skittered up the tree, I caught a glimpse of its bright cobalt blue belly. That trait allowed us to identify it:

a variety of western fence lizard

Pshawraven took a picture of it for me, since I wasn't quick enough but they're still in the camera.

I also saw a really interesting bug with a bright 'caution red' beginning and end but a clear middle. Don't know what he was and he moved too fast for me to get the insect expert in the family to look, but he was colorful. Probably would taste bad to birds, too. That's the only reason I can think of for such outrageous colors.
You are not entitled to your opinion. You are entitled to your informed opinion. No one is entitled to be ignorant. Harlan Ellison

Image
Image

DC: ImageImageImageImageImageImage Nyoka: ImageImageImage Flowergame: ImageImage
User avatar
TxCat
CreaturesTrade
HS Moderator
 
Posts: 3808
Joined: October 7th, 2010, 2:44:38 pm
Location: FoxHeart Acres, FL
Gender: Female

Re: Wildlife

Postby Destrauxe » June 15th, 2011, 3:27:53 am

I have taken care of many odd wildlife-type animals. My family seems to be the kind of family who ends up with odd animals and has the wierd family member that brings home evrything you could ever imagine. Sure, I've handled fish, frogs, snakes, toads, etc. from the wild but alot of people have.

My grandfather took a bear off the hands of a man who was stuck with them and did not even know what to feed them because there was an old lady in his family who had all of them but died. So my grandpa took a baby and I was ove rhis house alot helping him bottle feed the bear and I played with it to. It was really fun, but we did know we were going to have to rehome it. We kept him in the house because he was so young only a few moths old. We found him a caring home in the local zoo because he obviously could not go back into the wild and we are really against people keeping big wild animals as pets. We kept him until he no longer needed bottle fed and then gave him to the zoo.

A few months later my grandpa found a nest of baby racoons in his attic and the mother with them. But the mother died and so he took the three little babies and bottle fed them just like the bear. And just like the bear I was there to help take care of them whenever I could be. There were three, they were all boys, and they were pretty friendly. We did however raise them to be wild. As soon as they were off the bottle they were outside. They lived in my grandpas shed-they have a ton of land-away from the house and they had free roam of the shed. They slept in it during the day and came out around twilight. We did leave them scraps of food for a while and we would go out and see them but they grew more and more independant on their own so we let them go. They are all grown up now, and gone. We tagged them with those little silver rings on their legs aswell.
I was a bit attatched to the animals. We called the bear 'Smokey'. The raccoons had two sets of names. My grandpa called them 'Lary', 'Curly', and 'Moe'. I called them 'Roscoe', 'Rascal', and 'Bandit'.
Image
I'm sorry, my life is a mess right now. If you need to contact me you can do so here.
User avatar
Destrauxe
CreaturesTrade
MagiStream Donor
 
Posts: 13600
Joined: August 12th, 2010, 1:34:17 pm
Location: Location
Gender: Female

Re: Wildlife

Postby TxCat » June 18th, 2011, 2:25:21 pm

Last Saturday something like a neighbor using a hammer woke me up early. I couldn't figure out what it was until I looked out my window.

The Lord God birds (otherwise known as the sometimes-elusive-usually-thought-extinct ivory billed woodpecker) were back. Less than twenty-five feet away from the house was a pair of these twenty inch birds. Sometimes supposed sightings turn out to be the related reticulated woodpecker, but these had the distinct white striping along the leading edges of their wings and I had a good, clear view of the white bill which gives them their name.

I woke up Pshawraven so she could see them --- this is a life list bird for sure! --- and we watched them for about ten minutes before they flew away. Male and female, the females have a black crest rather than a red one and aren't as big.

Yesterday, driving on our errands, we saw a robin-like brown striped bird in the bush nearby. Pshawraven backed the truck up so we could see better and it turned out to be a hermit thrush. While these are common, neither she nor I had had a sighting in the wild. One more bird to mark off the lists!

It's been quiet here since the wildfire. I haven't seen much of the creatures who normally frequent our neck of the woods at all. I'm thinking it may have gotten too dry for them or they were caught in the fire. Not even the snakes are active, which is odd. Normally we'd have had at least the hognose out in the yard by now.
You are not entitled to your opinion. You are entitled to your informed opinion. No one is entitled to be ignorant. Harlan Ellison

Image
Image

DC: ImageImageImageImageImageImage Nyoka: ImageImageImage Flowergame: ImageImage
User avatar
TxCat
CreaturesTrade
HS Moderator
 
Posts: 3808
Joined: October 7th, 2010, 2:44:38 pm
Location: FoxHeart Acres, FL
Gender: Female

Re: Wildlife

Postby Destrauxe » June 19th, 2011, 11:12:27 pm

I think the riticulated woodpecker is so cool. They are amazing. They're huge. O.o
Image
I'm sorry, my life is a mess right now. If you need to contact me you can do so here.
User avatar
Destrauxe
CreaturesTrade
MagiStream Donor
 
Posts: 13600
Joined: August 12th, 2010, 1:34:17 pm
Location: Location
Gender: Female

Re: Wildlife

Postby TxCat » June 20th, 2011, 5:01:32 am

Nightshayde wrote:I think the riticulated woodpecker is so cool. They are amazing. They're huge. O.o


They really are :D I hope someday you get to see an ivory bill...they're even larger and more majestic. I can understand why they're having such a hard time proving that these guys still exist; they're timid and fast flyers. If they suspect they're being watched, they disappear in the literal blink of an eye. When I turned the report into the Cornell birding site, they expanded the range down here only because I was able to describe their distinct call and knock and because they make a distinct type of hole in trees for which I had pictures.

This afternoon we got another bird for our life list: a pine warbler. His bright yellow front combined with sparrow-like striping attracted my attention.

A coyote has been getting into our trash. I'm debating a live trap so that I can put him in an enclosure and tame him. Always wanted one and I could get the wildlife license to keep him too. They're considered vermin here and you're supposed to shoot them. I can't bear to do it.
You are not entitled to your opinion. You are entitled to your informed opinion. No one is entitled to be ignorant. Harlan Ellison

Image
Image

DC: ImageImageImageImageImageImage Nyoka: ImageImageImage Flowergame: ImageImage
User avatar
TxCat
CreaturesTrade
HS Moderator
 
Posts: 3808
Joined: October 7th, 2010, 2:44:38 pm
Location: FoxHeart Acres, FL
Gender: Female

Re: Wildlife

Postby Batty » June 21st, 2011, 9:07:07 am

TxCat wrote:
A coyote has been getting into our trash. I'm debating a live trap so that I can put him in an enclosure and tame him. Always wanted one and I could get the wildlife license to keep him too. They're considered vermin here and you're supposed to shoot them. I can't bear to do it.


Is it possible to tame a wild-born coyote? Captive-born dingoes get used to people and become quite tame, but wild dingoes never do.

In fact, wild dingoes that become used to people become very dangerous because they see young children as prey.
User avatar
Batty
CreaturesTrade
 
Posts: 20
Joined: January 8th, 2011, 9:49:30 pm
Gender: Male

PreviousNext

Return to Hall of Speakers

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest